Kentucky farmer says new grocery store policy forced her to close her small business

A Northern Kentucky woman is shutting down her tomato farm after saying a policy change at major grocery chains is now impacting direct delivery to local farmers Over the past nine years, the local farmer Linda Fritz picked her organic cherry tomatoes and delivered them directly to Kroger stores for sale in Greater Cincinnati. “I started delivering and found out there was a policy change and I couldn’t deliver direct to the store anymore like I had done all these years,” said Fritz, owner of Sun Sugar Farms. . According to Fritz, the recent “policy change means she and other local farmers can no longer deliver directly to stores as they did in the past. Instead, the change means local farmers would have to go through a warehouse.” It’s much more complicated and expensive, so there was no way for me to go on,” Fritz said. “The problem was I had 1,000 tomato plants in the ground for them.” Fritz didn’t want to throw away her tomatoes and all her hard work, so she moved forward to find local businesses to sell and local charities where she could Monday, Fritz and volunteers from the Society of St. Andrew spent the day picking tomatoes to donate to local charities. “, Fritz said. One such charity is La Soupe, an organization that works with local farmers to save perishables and their team of chefs prepares soups and meals that are distributed to families in need. There the tomatoes will be pickled and turned into puree and marinara sauce which will be used this week when volunteers distribute breaded meals to families in Cincinnati.” This week I think we will be making pasta, meatballs and a vegetable side dish, so as a good complete meal for a family of four to six,” said La Soupe’s transformed chef, Sydney Fischer. Although Fritz takes comfort in knowing that her last harvest will be used for the better, she said it was the end of her farming days. “It’s a big loss. It is very unfortunate, but God is good. They will be a way out. There could be something good coming out of it,” she said. To learn more about how you can volunteer with the Society of St. Andrew, click here.

A northern Kentucky woman is closing her tomato farm after saying a policy change at major grocery chains is now impacting direct delivery from local farmers.

For the past nine years, local farmer Linda Fritz has picked her organic cherry tomatoes and delivered them directly to Kroger stores for sale in Greater Cincinnati.

“I started shipping and found out there was a policy change and I couldn’t ship direct to the store anymore like I had for all these years,” said Sun owner Fritz. Sugar Farms.

According to Fritz, the recent policy change means she and other local farmers can no longer deliver directly to stores as they did in the past.

Instead, the change means local farmers would have to go through a warehouse.

“It’s much more complicated and expensive, so I had no way to continue,” Fritz said. “The problem was that I had 1,000 tomato plants in the ground for them.”

Fritz didn’t want to throw away her tomatoes and all her hard work, so she scrambled to find local businesses to sell and local charities she could donate to.

On Monday, Fritz and volunteers from the Society of St. Andrew spent the day picking tomatoes to donate to local charities.

“They’re volunteering to come and help the commercial farms pick up the excess, and we’ll deliver it to La Soupe,” Fritz said.

One such charity is La Soupe, an organization that works with local farmers to save perishable foods and their team of chefs prepare soups and meals that are distributed to families in need.

There, the tomatoes will be pickled and turned into a puree and marinara sauce that will be used this week when volunteers distribute breaded meals to families in Cincinnati.

“This week I think we’ll be making pasta, meatballs and a side vegetable, so a good complete meal for a family of four to six,” said The Soup’s transformed chef, Sydney Fischer. .

While Fritz takes comfort in knowing her last harvest will be used for the better, she said it was the end of her farming days.

“It’s a big loss. It is very unfortunate, but God is good. They will be a way out. There might be something good coming out of it,” she said,

To learn more about how you can volunteer with the Society of St. Andrew, click here.

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